.NET Core and Devops Part 3: Running ASP.NET Core Services in Docker

Welcome to the third in a series of articles focused on .NET Core from a devops perspective where I hope to demonstrate how we can practically start developing and deploying .NET Core applications on Linux.

In this article I will walk through how we can use Docker to containerise our ASP.NET Core services. This process will form the basis of our final end to end build and deployment process.

Part 1: Running our first .NET Core application on Linux

Part 2: Running our first ASP.NET Core service on Linux

Part 3: Running ASP.NET Core Services on Linux in Docker (This Article)

Part 4: Setting up a CI build and deploy pipeline for our ASP.NET Core Service using Docker

If you have experience of using Docker on Linux then great. If not then just follow along, you will start to see the possibilities that Docker can bring to your build and release process. I am going to be using the same Downcount ASP.NET Core Web API that I introduced in Part 2.

Continue reading .NET Core and Devops Part 3: Running ASP.NET Core Services in Docker

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.NET Core and Devops Part 2: Running our first ASP.NET Core Service on Linux

Welcome to the second in a series of articles focused on .NET Core from a devops perspective where I hope to demonstrate how we can practically start developing and deploying .NET Core applications on Linux.

Part 1: Running our first .NET Core application on Linux

Part 2: Running our first ASP.NET Core service on Linux (This Article)

Part 3: Running ASP.NET Core Services on Linux in Docker

Part 4: Setting up a CI build and deploy pipeline for our ASP.NET Core Service using Docker

As a devops engineer working a lot on the Microsoft stack, it is second nature nowadays to automatically setup and configure farms of Windows web servers running IIS and deploy ASP.NET based web sites and services to them. But now with .NET Core and ASP.NET Core it is possible to run those same web sites on Linux.

In my opinion, one of the main motivations to use Linux is cost. In Azure, Linux VMs are approximately half the price of Windows VMs. A D2v2 Windows Server is about £122/month whilst a D2v2 Ubuntu server runs at £62/month. If you are working at scale in the cloud then that is going to equate to a huge cost saving.

In this series of articles I hope to demonstrate that moving to Linux is possible and practical with a real life example including all the automated configuration and deployment processes.

Continue reading .NET Core and Devops Part 2: Running our first ASP.NET Core Service on Linux

.NET Core and Devops Part 1: Running our first .NET Core Application on Linux

Welcome to the first in a series of articles focused on .NET Core from a devops perspective where I hope to demonstrate how we can practically start developing and deploying .NET Core applications on Linux.

Part 1: Running our first .NET Core application on Linux (This Aritcle)

Part 2: Running our first ASP.NET Core service on Linux

Part 3: Running ASP.NET Core Services on Linux in Docker

Part 4: Setting up a CI build and deploy pipeline for our ASP.NET Core Service using Docker

As a devops engineer working a lot on the Microsoft stack, it is second nature nowadays to automatically setup and configure farms of Windows web servers running IIS and deploy ASP.NET based web sites and services to them. But now with .NET Core and ASP.NET Core it is possible to run those same web sites on Linux.

In my opinion, one of the main motivations to use Linux is cost. In Azure, Linux VMs are approximately half the price of Windows VMs. A D2v2 Windows Server is about £122/month whilst a D2v2 Ubuntu server runs at £62/month. If you are working at scale in the cloud then that is going to equate to a huge cost saving.

In this series of articles I  hope to demonstrate that moving to Linux is possible and practical with a real life example including all the automated configuration and deployment processes.

Continue reading .NET Core and Devops Part 1: Running our first .NET Core Application on Linux